13 Reminders For Single Tasking

13 Reminders For Single Tasking

In my previous post on The Art of Single Tasking, I set a challenge for myself to practice single tasking rather than multitasking. You can read about it here.

I have now been on my challenge for about 2 weeks now and have noticed a big shift in my productivity and the way I feel throughout the day. I have been able to get so much more done by simply acting with intention. In addition, I have found that I now go about my day with more clarity, gratitude and a calmer demeanour.

One of the surprising things that has come out from this little experiment is that I have felt like I am able to let some things go - simply because I recognise how a lot of things can add complication and unnecessary stress to my life, which detracts my energy from doing the things that really matter.

So, in a way, single tasking is about creating a more minimalist lifestyle with more thought behind each action.

During my 2 weeks, I have noticed that there are a number of tasks where I would subconsciously default into multi-tasking mode. There were specific tasks (such as breakfast, commuting to work, etc) where I would always feel the need to multi-task because I had succumbed to this habit overtime.  

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The Art of Single Tasking

The Art of Single Tasking

Over the last few years, multi-tasking has slowly become a habit for me. It has only been recently that I have started to discover the art of single tasking for myself! Initially, I thought it was just a more efficient way for me to juggle various things at the one time. 

I felt like I was being productive; ticking things off my to do list. It seemed like it was having a positive impact on my life at work.

So after work, I would continue my multi-tasking at home too. I would do my house chores while preparing dinner while writing a blog post. Over time, I found that multi-tasking had become more than a habit, but a way I went about my day. It was so rare for me to be single tasked focused, doing only one thing at a time - like eat my breakfast without staring at my computer screen. 

By the end of the day, when I had finally finished ticked off all my tasks in a chaotic scramble, I felt restless, anxious and disconnected. I felt like I was struggling to find calm as I moved throughout the day.

I believe that by doing various tasks at the same time, we no longer move through each moment with intention, but simply going through the motions. I believe that each intention holds energy (whether negative or positive).

And by doing things without intent, without thought, without focus, we are not giving this task our positive energy in order to truly experience the moment. 

As a result, we end up gliding along the surface of our experiences - failing to go deeper.

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